Repost: Oh yes, let’s please treat Greece the same way Germany was treated

This blog entry was first published about a year ago on Medium, and I’ve wanted to revisit it as we are around of the anniversary of the spike of Greek debt crisis.

Noteworthy introduction: where is Greece, and all of us, today, a year after this blog post was initially published?

In short – fucked up beyond all recognition. Greek populist ruling party which won the elections at the height of debt crisis promising to Greek people debt will be forgiven by creditors and all will be fine, Syriza, played all of their cards in order to “allow public” to change their mind – in months after this blog post was initially published on Medium, there was a referendum where Greek voters had a chance to vote for making a deal with creditors instead of trying to bail on their debt and there were even consequential elections where Syriza won the elections again despite the obvious – that they have screwed up their voters, while promising they will save their voters from the nearly impossible debt while screwing up the creditors.

The deal probably ended up to be better than defaulting on the debt, but not by much. Greek economy burdened by the debt but also incompetent government is struggling probably more than ever. Whole Syriza’s performance actually made deal with the creditors even worse than what was offered to Greece in the months ahead of the whole show, hence people of Greece are living harder than they would if Syriza did their job or has never came to power.

On the other hand, despite being a good player (and payer of the debt) according to the terms of the deal, creditors still refuse to ease the conditions of the deal for Greece. And I estimate they will continue to refuse until less populist political option is elected in some future elections in Greece, options which would actually be able to negotiate with the creditors instead of antagonizing them and antagonizing the public against the creditors.

But, in the end, Greece (luckily for it) wasn’t treated same as Germany after World War II. And despite what pundits would like you to believe, it’s actually a good thing. Why? The original post explaining that follows below, or after the click:

Continue reading “Repost: Oh yes, let’s please treat Greece the same way Germany was treated”

On authenticity of Bavarian restaurants in Munich

Warning: some of my bad German language skills follow below. You’ve been warned.

So, today I’ve had a mishap with my lunch I’ve brought from home, hence I’ve headed to eat outside. Completely unexpectedly, due to various factors, I’ve ended up in Bavarian restaurant called “Bavaria” – which is situated right on, you would never guess, Bayerstraße (“Bavarian street”) in Munich. Continue reading “On authenticity of Bavarian restaurants in Munich”

There are sincere revolutions

This revolution is an US, EU, communist, capitalist, etc… propaganda

The position of the cynic is that he alone holds some piece of terrible, unvarnished wisdom. The paradigmatic cynic tells you privately, in a confidential low-key voice: “But don’t you get it that it is all really about (money/power/sex), that all high principles and values are just empty phrases which count for nothing?” What the cynics don’t see is their own naivety, the naivety of their cynical wisdom that ignores the power of illusions.
~ Slavoj Žižek, “Why cynics are wrong?”

The popular stand “self-aware” and “truth loving” inhabitants of our little planet tend to take towards smaller and bigger revolutions these days seems to be utterly cynical view how no act will change a thing. Continue reading “There are sincere revolutions”

Codility actually rocks…

I’m passing through guided programming courses on Codility these weekends, as much as time allows me.

Couple of notes connected to that experience…

First, the practices are excellent. They start off gently and then get to really interesting problems. I am writing this under the influence of unexpected solution to the one of them which I didn’t see coming for a while as I was banging my head on the desk. :-) That’s the good part.

The bad part? Continue reading “Codility actually rocks…”

Python SAR (sysstat) parsing module (pre) released

And now something completely different and as unexpected as the Spanish inquisition! Another release of Python module to PyPi and GitHub.

This time it’s a SAR (sysstat service) log file parser. If you are a UNIX/linux sysadmin and not sure what SAR is, head on here, and here for introduction on the subject. Continue reading “Python SAR (sysstat) parsing module (pre) released”

Python packages deployed to PyPi

I am very pleased to announce that Python packages Axigen-API and software_versions are now available through PyPi. They should have been from the start but… :-)

Of course, Github repositories are at the same place (Axigen-API @ github, software_versions @ github), with the reorganized codebase so now you can pull them and do usual python setup procedure.

Anatomy of PHP Shells – my talk at FSEC conference

You can check out my latest talk at FSEC, regional security conference (held at FOI university in Varaždin, Croatia) here at SlideShare.

Please leave a comment if you are interested in seeing the slides and SlideShare is not good enough for you, for any reason. :-)

Holding a talk at FSEC conference was a pleasant experience. Great talks, excellent crew, even better audience, extremely pretty town. I hope I see you all next year.

Obligatory credit: the talk was co-authored by my young colleague Ivan Špoljarić.

Few thoughts on Syria, US interventionism and all that stuff

This basically started as a comment to a Facebook status of one friend who lives in US. I felt a need to make it a blog post, despite my wish to keep politics out of this blog.

Kelly asked a really good question, concerning US intervention in Syria but also a generally very good question about our democratic systems of rule:

[…] I have some questions for all of you to consider and would love to know your thoughts…

In reality, Congress is in the crosshairs on this, not the president (see above). If the polls are to be believed, roughly 80% of Americans are against military action in Syria, for a host of reasons. This week, John McCain, and many others in both houses, faced town halls filled with angry constituents, including their supporters, wanting to know why he wasn’t listening to them when they told him to vote no.

This is an extremely important question in any democracy.

If elected representatives vote against the wishes of their constituents – particularly when it appears to be a majority of those constituents who have very vocally made their wishes known – do we still have a democracy?

(I’ve edited the question, discarded 2 additional questions which have no connection to this blog post).

My comment to that post turned into 3 separate comments ranging from direct answer to Kelly’s question and all the way to why I consider intervention (or lack of it) in Syria crucial for the future of Arab world. Continue reading “Few thoughts on Syria, US interventionism and all that stuff”

Weekend Python+Django project: Quotes

Woo-hoo! It’s that time of the year when heat is wearing off, people get back to work and programmers do new weekend projects. :-)

Meet Quotes @ Krivokuca.eu, my latest open source effort.  It is written to demonstrate my skills in modern technologies (Django MVC Python web framework, mobile-first adaptive design methodology, understanding of relational and nosql database concepts, comfortability of working with modern javascript libraries like jQuery…).

It is also made to show off how I’m more cool than you, hence what I read is way more cool than your recently-read library. :-)

It’s not a big thing, but it took me 2 weekends to write it and start filling up its databases with entries.

Oh yes, it’s open source also!