Anatomy of PHP Shells – my talk at FSEC conference

You can check out my latest talk at FSEC, regional security conference (held at FOI university in Varaždin, Croatia) here at SlideShare.

Please leave a comment if you are interested in seeing the slides and SlideShare is not good enough for you, for any reason. :-)

Holding a talk at FSEC conference was a pleasant experience. Great talks, excellent crew, even better audience, extremely pretty town. I hope I see you all next year.

Obligatory credit: the talk was co-authored by my young colleague Ivan Špoljarić.

Few thoughts on Syria, US interventionism and all that stuff

This basically started as a comment to a Facebook status of one friend who lives in US. I felt a need to make it a blog post, despite my wish to keep politics out of this blog.

Kelly asked a really good question, concerning US intervention in Syria but also a generally very good question about our democratic systems of rule:

[…] I have some questions for all of you to consider and would love to know your thoughts…

In reality, Congress is in the crosshairs on this, not the president (see above). If the polls are to be believed, roughly 80% of Americans are against military action in Syria, for a host of reasons. This week, John McCain, and many others in both houses, faced town halls filled with angry constituents, including their supporters, wanting to know why he wasn’t listening to them when they told him to vote no.

This is an extremely important question in any democracy.

If elected representatives vote against the wishes of their constituents – particularly when it appears to be a majority of those constituents who have very vocally made their wishes known – do we still have a democracy?

(I’ve edited the question, discarded 2 additional questions which have no connection to this blog post).

My comment to that post turned into 3 separate comments ranging from direct answer to Kelly’s question and all the way to why I consider intervention (or lack of it) in Syria crucial for the future of Arab world. Continue reading “Few thoughts on Syria, US interventionism and all that stuff”

Weekend Python+Django project: Quotes

Woo-hoo! It’s that time of the year when heat is wearing off, people get back to work and programmers do new weekend projects. :-)

Meet Quotes @ Krivokuca.eu, my latest open source effort.  It is written to demonstrate my skills in modern technologies (Django MVC Python web framework, mobile-first adaptive design methodology, understanding of relational and nosql database concepts, comfortability of working with modern javascript libraries like jQuery…).

It is also made to show off how I’m more cool than you, hence what I read is way more cool than your recently-read library. :-)

It’s not a big thing, but it took me 2 weekends to write it and start filling up its databases with entries.

Oh yes, it’s open source also!

This should be periodic on any blog: Search Queries Answers :-)

So, every now and then I am throughly surprised by search engine queries people use to bump on my blog. It had occured to me that every decent blog should have periodic Q&A post concerning those.

So, here are some of the best, in one way or another, questions my visitors asked the almighty Google: Continue reading “This should be periodic on any blog: Search Queries Answers :-)”

Kindle 4 owner’s take on the Paperwhite

Yeah, obviously, as soon as I’ve realized Paperwhite actually ships to Croatia, I’ve ordered one in order to upgrade my Kindle-istic experience of bookreading. I’m writing this short “review” as a user who previously used (and at the time of writing this still owns) Kindle 4 (black one, 2012 edition).

Paperwhite comes packages in literally the same kind of the box as all the older Kindles. Existing owners will have a general idea what I’m talking about and for new buyers – packaging is excellent. You can be fairly sure your Kindle will survive all the odds of the travel, even across the world.

Continue reading “Kindle 4 owner’s take on the Paperwhite”

2011 Census results in Croatia, and historical retrospective

During the 2011, Croatian government organized regular census of population which is made once every 10 years. And this last census brought some interesting and some even amusing figures:

  • Disturbing fact is that this census evidenced the decrease of population in Croatia during last 10 years by approximately 152.000 (152 thousand!) people (reference). For some of the big nations this wouldn’t be a big matter. But that number is close to 3% of the previous census (2001.) population. There are multiple reasons for that, but having in mind we had kind of financially prospoerous years between 2001. and 2008., main reason for this decrease is more likely everlasting low natality issue and not emigration. Although, since 2011. and in the following years, emigration is also to become major reason for national depopulation. But that’s the subject for some other blog post.
  • There are actually 6 Jews in Croatia which have declared themselves also Serbian minority (reference). I would like to meet them and buy them beer, since I’m quite convinced they have basically trolled the census workers. ;) Continue reading “2011 Census results in Croatia, and historical retrospective”

The unlikely winner of the instant messaging wars

Recent news (well, still speculations) of Microsoft dropping the Live messenger in favor of Skype made me think… Instant messaging market was a fairly crowded space invaded by many proprietary solutions and one widely adopted open standard. For a long time, it seemed like proprietary solutions are winning the war, but in the end (probably due to failure of big players to monetize their services through advertising models) the last man standing will be the open XMPP standard. What the heck happened? Continue reading “The unlikely winner of the instant messaging wars”