Few thoughts on Syria, US interventionism and all that stuff

This basically started as a comment to a Facebook status of one friend who lives in US. I felt a need to make it a blog post, despite my wish to keep politics out of this blog.

Kelly asked a really good question, concerning US intervention in Syria but also a generally very good question about our democratic systems of rule:

[…] I have some questions for all of you to consider and would love to know your thoughts…

In reality, Congress is in the crosshairs on this, not the president (see above). If the polls are to be believed, roughly 80% of Americans are against military action in Syria, for a host of reasons. This week, John McCain, and many others in both houses, faced town halls filled with angry constituents, including their supporters, wanting to know why he wasn’t listening to them when they told him to vote no.

This is an extremely important question in any democracy.

If elected representatives vote against the wishes of their constituents – particularly when it appears to be a majority of those constituents who have very vocally made their wishes known – do we still have a democracy?

(I’ve edited the question, discarded 2 additional questions which have no connection to this blog post).

My comment to that post turned into 3 separate comments ranging from direct answer to Kelly’s question and all the way to why I consider intervention (or lack of it) in Syria crucial for the future of Arab world. Continue reading “Few thoughts on Syria, US interventionism and all that stuff”

2011 Census results in Croatia, and historical retrospective

During the 2011, Croatian government organized regular census of population which is made once every 10 years. And this last census brought some interesting and some even amusing figures:

  • Disturbing fact is that this census evidenced the decrease of population in Croatia during last 10 years by approximately 152.000 (152 thousand!) people (reference). For some of the big nations this wouldn’t be a big matter. But that number is close to 3% of the previous census (2001.) population. There are multiple reasons for that, but having in mind we had kind of financially prospoerous years between 2001. and 2008., main reason for this decrease is more likely everlasting low natality issue and not emigration. Although, since 2011. and in the following years, emigration is also to become major reason for national depopulation. But that’s the subject for some other blog post.
  • There are actually 6 Jews in Croatia which have declared themselves also Serbian minority (reference). I would like to meet them and buy them beer, since I’m quite convinced they have basically trolled the census workers. ;) Continue reading “2011 Census results in Croatia, and historical retrospective”